Thursday, 1 September 2011

M/M Issue: September 2011




Manner of Man Magazine
Issue: September 2011

Table of Contents


Editorial: Aspirational Fantasties vs Truth

The Brand: Manner of Man

Interview with Karim Zeriahen

Highgrove

Danger Zone

Henry Herbert Tailors

Interview with Eric Watson

Photographer: Donato Oronzo Cacciapaglia

Moments of Absolute Clarity #6
an exclusive series produced by Lalle Johnson

M/M Editorial: Aspirational Fantasies vs Truth

Editorial Commentary by Manner of Man Magazine co-owners Nicola Linza and Cristoffer Neljesjö and is only available in print edition.

M/M The Brand: Manner of Man


Image provided to Manner of Man Magazine by the Linza family archives. All rights reserved.

M/M Interview with Karim Zeriahen

Image of Karim Zeriahen provided to Manner of Man Magazine/Welldressed by Karim Zeriahen and cannot be reproduced without written authorisation. All rights reserved.

This exclusive interview with Karim Zeriahen was conducted by Nicola Linza and Cristoffer Neljesjö in Paris during May 2011


Interview with Karim Zeriahen

What inspired you to be a filmmaker?

I used to be an ice skater for many years in the french team and I guess having my eyes open when I was skating were my first introduction to moving images.

It felt like a perpetual travelling. I guess when a few years later I was given a camera to shoot a dance piece by Philippe Decouflé, it felt quite natural for me to focus on movement and body language.

But my inspiration as a documentary film maker, i guess, came from a movie by Ken Loach: " Raining stones ". It was the first time I could sense humanity and emotions that strong in a character.

I was then drawn to filming people and specially people with a certain age that could tell stories and share experiences.

You can interview one person of the past who would it be? And why?

There are so many including Albert Einstein, Oscar Wilde, Sigmund Freund but my dream would be to interview Ralph Waldo Emerson.

One of his texts on nature is an endless source of inspiration to me. It opened my eyes on the depths and the beauty of human nature. Something I really think about when I am shooting my video portraits.

How do you approach each new project?

Each project is so different that the form , the research and the making is driven by the subject itself.

Usually, I read and watch all I can about the subject, then I escape from where I live to a neutral place and write the project. I need to be alone in a place that I don't know. I need to feel like a stranger so I can face the unknown. Hotel rooms are very convenient, you can make research online, lie down on the bed, take a walk, go to a museum and come back and do some more writing. The film will be tainted by the atmosphere of the place you are in.

How do you describe your style?

Hard question but I would say my interests are human encounters and body language combined with a real pleasure in editing room trying to create some sort of choreography with bits of rushes and music.

If you weren’t a filmmaker what would you be doing?

I would probably be a therapist...

The above interview with Karim Zeriahen 2011 © Manner of Man Magazine/Welldressed. All rights reserved. Reproduction is strictly prohibited without written permission from the publisher.

M/M Highgrove

M/M Danger Zone




















Photo by M/M Studio. All rights reserved.



“Don't be afraid to make a mistake, your readers might like it.”
-William Randolph Hearst


"Unfortunately he didn't live long enough to realise he was wrong."
- Manner of Man Magazine


M/M Henry Herbert Tailors


Image provided by Henry Herbert Tailors. All rights reserved.

Henry Herbert Tailors - Savile Row by Scooter

M/M Interview with Eric Watson

Image of Eric Watson provided to Manner of Man Magazine/Welldressed for exclusive use and cannot be reproduced without written authorisation. All rights reserved.

This exclusive interview with Eric Watson was conducted by Nicola Linza and Cristoffer Neljesjö in Tampa, Florida during May 2011


Classical Talks – Interviews with members of The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art America



Interview with Eric Watson


What inspired you to become an architect? And have a focus on traditional Classic design?

I was seven when my family built a traditional house and I became interested in architecture and especially houses. From the numerous site visits during construction, I gained an awareness of design, detail, and the general process. Our house was one of the first in a neighborhood of traditional houses in a variety of styles. My favorite after school activity was to tromp through the nearby houses under construction. I endlessly studied their details, floor plans, how bricks were laid, proportions of dormers, roof pitches, and window and shutter configurations. Learning from these houses, I developed an awareness of their distinct style characteristics. I recall spending countless hours drawing and recreating my personal versions of what fascinated me.

Years later, while studying at Yale, a design studio changed the way I thought about architecture and buildings in general. Instead of seeing buildings as objects in the landscape - as architects almost always do, I learned that in many cases, a good traditional building is a well designed neighbor that contributes collectively with other buildings to enhance the streetscape and urban experience.


How would you describe your personal style?

Living in South Florida where summer lasts six months, whatever I wear, it’s got to be comfortable. Florida is just too hot to fuss over endless outfits and complicated clothing options. I keep my clothes simple. Natural fabrics in solid colors and small prints are flexible to dress up or down with – nothing too trendy. If clothing is well made with quality materials in a classic style, I’ll usually like it. Nice shoes and belts are always important.


If you could do any building in any city what type would it be? And where would it be?

Since I’ve only designed houses so far, I think I’d like to design a town hall, or a public library. The building would be on a specifically designated civic site in a small southern town designed by one of the great town planners – perhaps Nolen, Olmstead, or Duany. Like all good pre-war traditional architecture, the building would be built with durable, authentic materials appropriate to its style and location. The building and its interior would be splendidly detailed.


You have to single out one particular house and an icon of inspiration which would it be? And why?

Reynolda House - designed by the underappreciated American architect Charles Barton Keen. What strikes me about this early twentieth century country house is how inventive the design is. Although the house is large and spacious, the unconventional floor plan feels surprisingly informal and comfortable. The bold massing is a clever response to the architectural program and the site conditions. The material and detail expression is exceptional for its restraint and efficiency. The house is a refreshing interpretation of the Colonial Revival and Arts and Crafts styles.

With my own work, I’m not interested in creating the perfect representation of a particular historical style. My design approach has always been how any style can be interpreted by the synthesis of the regional context, the architectural program, and the building form.


If you weren’t an architect what do you think you would be doing today?

If I weren’t an architect, this interview would be about my life as an actor on the big screen!

The above interview with Eric Watson 2011 © Manner of Man Magazine/Welldressed. All rights reserved. Reproduction is strictly prohibited without written permission from the publisher.

M/M Photographer Donato Oronzo Cacciapaglia




















Photos supplied to Manner of Man Magazine by Donato Oronzo Cacciapaglia and cannot be reproduced without written authorisation. All rights reserved.

M/M M/M Moments of Absolute Clarity #6

an exclusive series produced by Lalle Johnson






















Image by Lalle Johnson exclusively for Manner of Man Magazine/Welldressed and cannot be reproduced without written authorisation. All rights reserved.


2011 © Manner of Man Magazine/Welldressed. All rights reserved. Reproduction is strictly prohibited without written permission from the publisher.